Normal view

Coordinator under hire.

Roma Heroes - I. International Roma Storytelling Festival - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Roma Heroes - I. International Roma Storytelling Festival

Drámai roma sorsok a Stúdió K színpadán - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Drámai roma sorsok a Stúdió K színpadán

Angry Buddha documentary - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Angry Buddha documentary

Logikai foglalkozások a Zagyva-parton, ahol se internet, se önbizalom - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Logikai foglalkozások a Zagyva-parton, ahol se internet, se önbizalom

Let’s Help Each Other Association participates in the International Video Pitch Competiton - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Let’s Help Each Other Association participates in the International Video Pitch Competiton

Social Enterprise Workshop in Budapest - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Social Enterprise Workshop in Budapest

Addressing Extreme Poverty in Hungary – How the Development Sector is working - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Addressing Extreme Poverty in Hungary – How the Development Sector is working

Roma Heroes - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Roma Heroes Empowerment and Awareness-raising through Contemporary Drama

Drama and storytelling are extraordinary and influential tools when it comes to shaping attitudes and inspiring action. Badur Foundation is therefore proud to support the newest educational programme of the Independent Theatre company, which will be based on contemporary Roma plays - a first time concept for Hungary. By profiling value-led, active and successful Roma drama heroes, Independent Theatre hopes both to empower Roma communities and to differentiate the stereotypical image of the majority.

Contemporary Roma playwrights are not widely known, despite the artistic excellence they represent and the timely messages they wish to convey. Independent Theatre’s newest educational programme is based on four modern Roma plays; each of which talks of profound human struggles. The work of Mihaela Dragan, Alina Serban, Richard O’Neill and Dijana Pavlovic are centred on strong Roma heroines who challenge the status quo. One rebels against family traditions, another excels in her studies despite personal hardship, the third achieves structural changes through civil disobedience and the fourth challenges the state authorities. These are powerful life stories which can serve as an example to everyone, especially to young Roma.

All of the plays were shown in Hungary’s ground-breaking Roma Storytelling Festival, which attracted 370 viewers and reached over a million people through its media coverage. The below video clips give a glimpse into the inspirational and thought-provoking performances:

These stories will be the basis of some innovative educational material and a workshop series that Independent Theatre will bring to 180 Roma youngsters in order to foster active citizenship. The following organisations – the majority of them specialised in teaching and mentoring Roma university students- will host the workshops:

  1. RefoRom, Reformed Gipsy* College Budapest,
  2. Romaversitas Foundation, Budapest,
  3. Pressley Ridge Foundation, Salgótarján,
  4. Wlislocki Henrik College, Pécs,
  5. Dr. Ámbédkar School, Miskolc,
  6. Lutheran Roma College, Nyíregyháza,
  7. Informal youth group, Hajdúhadháza
  8. Greek Catholic Gipsy College, Miskolc
  9. ELTE Department of Media and Communication, Roma Visual Laboratory

Through cooperative and engaging workshops, young Roma people will have the opportunity to relate these stories to their own personal lives and reflect about everyday heroes in their own communities. Youngsters will also be supported to show these personal stories via a blog featuring their creative work reaching a much wider audience beyond the workshop participants. Through this element, the project also aims to initiate dialogue with the majority society and challenge entrenched stereotypes about the Roma community.

Beyond the awareness-raising work in Hungary, the team is committed to find partnerships and cooperation beyond Hungary. This would allow them to involve Roma and non-Roma youths in other geographic regions – preferably, but not exclusively in the home countries of the playwrights- so that the impact of the project can be multiplied.

Thumbnail - photo credit: Hernan Pinera (Creative Commons license)

* Gipsy is used as a direct translation for cigány in Hungarian.

The European Venture Philanthropy Association (EVPA) - Badur Foundation
Normal view

The European Venture Philanthropy Association (EVPA)

2016 Annual Report & Financial Statements - Badur Foundation
Normal view

2016 Annual Report & Financial Statements

Theravada Vision - Preserving historic photographs from the Buddhist community in Luang Prabang - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Theravada Vision - Preserving historic photographs from the Buddhist community in Luang Prabang

Empower Malawi solar fishing light technology and rental business - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Empower Malawi solar fishing light technology and rental business

Springboard Programme - 2017 - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Springboard Programme - 2017 Incubating social enterprises

In February 2017, Badur Foundation re-launched its Social Enterprise Competition in cooperation with NESsT to identify and  develop social enterprises that improve the employment chances and livelihood of people in deep poverty. The competition provides organisations or teams working in highly disadvantaged communities with vital professional and financial support for starting a new social enterprise. 

The Call for Application was launched in 2017 February and close to twenty applications were received. After the thorough assessment of the applications, Badur in cooperation with NESsT selected six organisations that receive a 5-month training and one-on-one mentoring from NESsT to elaborate their business plans. The selected organisations and teams are the following:

- Bagázs Association, Bag

- Fényhozók programme, Baks

- Kiút programme, Szabolcs-Szatmár County

- “Lehetőség a Családoknak 2005” Foundation, Mosonmagyaróvár

- NMCKKSzSz, Bátonyterenye

- Romama Social Cooperative, Lak

After the final pitch in November 2017, Badur Foundation will award up to two organisations with financial support to start their venture. The available funding is 10,000,000 HUF. Additionally, the selected organisations may receive further capacity building tailored to their needs.

Cseriti - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Cseriti Expanding Hungary’s first charity shop network

Charity shops couple an important social impact with significant environmental benefits. By selling good quality, second-hand items at low prices, they make shopping affordable for people in need while reusing and saving tons of goods from landfill. Badur Foundation in cooperation with PBG FMC and Impact Accelerator is proud to support the acceleration of Cseriti, Hungary’s first charity shop network that plans to expand its chain across Budapest and beyond.

The first charity shop in the UK was opened in 1899, and by now there are around 10,500 operating shops across the UK and Ireland. The concept is not only widely used in the UK, but charity shops are also widespread in other European countries. The conceptual and business models of these initiatives show remarkable national patterns. In the UK model, shops are usually operated by a not-for-profit organisation and run by volunteers. The low operating costs then enable the parent charity to use the profits to sponsor its primary purpose-led activities. In the German model, shops tend to employ individuals, who otherwise would not find a job on the primary labour market. Thus, the revenue is primarily used for expansion so that the charity shop network can create further employment opportunities and multiple its social impact. Notwithstanding both models have common additional benefits such as reusing second-hand items and saving them from the landfill.

Cseriti set up its first shop in 2011 in Budapest and, ever since, newer and newer sites have been opened. The network currently operates 7 shops with 14 employees and the opening of the 8th location is on its way. Cseriti follows the German model and has a threefold impact: Cseriti makes shopping affordable for those in need, creates environmental benefits through reuse, and offers employment opportunities for the unemployed.

The management of Cseriti has an ambitious plan for the future of its operations. On the short term, they would first like to expand the chain across Budapest, potentially followed by a country-wide expansion on the long run. In order to prepare for this process of expansion, Cseriti takes part in the Impact Accelerator programme run by Civil Support. Badur Foundation in cooperation with PBG FMC has committed to contribute to the financial costs of the acceleration in addition to offering their strategic input. The ultimate aim is to help the enterprise become investment-ready so that they can scale up their operations and social impact.

Az egyedüli haszon, amelyből élnek, az a közjó - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Az egyedüli haszon, amelyből élnek, az a közjó

Tiszta, használható és olcsó – Adományboltok Magyarországon - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Tiszta, használható és olcsó – Adományboltok Magyarországon

Az üzlet nem jótékonysági intézmény – de van, amelyik igen - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Az üzlet nem jótékonysági intézmény – de van, amelyik igen

Hajcsattól a szekrénysorig – az intelligens lomtalanítással mindenki jól jár - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Hajcsattól a szekrénysorig – az intelligens lomtalanítással mindenki jól jár

Feleslegessé vált holmijainkért házhoz jön egy doboz – Cseriti Box - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Feleslegessé vált holmijainkért házhoz jön egy doboz – Cseriti Box

Selected Sustainable Development Goals in Laos - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Selected Sustainable Development Goals in Laos

Education Policy and Data Center - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Education Policy and Data Center

Mire jó a tanoda? - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Mire jó a tanoda?

How Can Young Roma Achieve Success in Hungary? - Badur Foundation
Normal view

How Can Young Roma Achieve Success in Hungary?

Review of Vocational Education – The Wolf Report - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Review of Vocational Education – The Wolf Report

Family Background and access to ‘high status’ universities - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Family Background and access to ‘high status’ universities

Inspiring Policy: Graduate Outcomes and Social Mobility - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Inspiring Policy: Graduate Outcomes and Social Mobility

The Social Enterprise Ecosystem in Hungary - Badur Foundation
Normal view

The Social Enterprise Ecosystem in Hungary

Social Enterprise and Social Investment - An Overview - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Social Enterprise and Social Investment - An Overview

The State of Social Enterprise Report 2015 - Badur Foundation
Normal view

The State of Social Enterprise Report 2015

Water purification in Luang Prabang - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Water purification in Luang Prabang

British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme - Badur Foundation
Normal view

British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme

ANANTHA Publishing - Badur Foundation
Normal view

ANANTHA Publishing

The English Indices of Deprivation 2015 - Badur Foundation
Normal view

The English Indices of Deprivation 2015

Europe 2020 indicators - poverty and social exclusion - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Europe 2020 indicators - poverty and social exclusion

Biomass Briquettes: Turning Waste Into Energy - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Biomass Briquettes: Turning Waste Into Energy

The time of the Gypsies - Badur Foundation
Normal view

The time of the Gypsies

Patterns of Exclusion. Constructing Gypsy Ethnicity - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Patterns of Exclusion. Constructing Gypsy Ethnicity

A Magyarországi cigányság - Badur Foundation
Normal view

A Magyarországi cigányság

Gypsy Menace. Populism and the New Anti-Gypsy Politics - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Gypsy Menace. Populism and the New Anti-Gypsy Politics

Ki a cigány? - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Ki a cigány?

A relatív cigány a klasszifikációs küzdőtéren - Badur Foundation
Normal view

A relatív cigány a klasszifikációs küzdőtéren

“I always felt the Odd One Out”: Work-life balance among graduate Romani women in Hungary - Badur Foundation
Normal view

“I always felt the Odd One Out”: Work-life balance among graduate Romani women in Hungary

“It is better to be a Gypsy in Canada than being a Hungarian in Hungary” - Badur Foundation
Normal view

“It is better to be a Gypsy in Canada than being a Hungarian in Hungary”

Student scheme turns trash into treasure - for good causes - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Student scheme turns trash into treasure - for good causes

Nottingham Students win national social enterprise competition - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Nottingham Students win national social enterprise competition

Enactus Nottingham Crowned Enactus UK National Champion 2016 - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Enactus Nottingham Crowned Enactus UK National Champion 2016

Request a Collection of Bulky Items - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Request a Collection of Bulky Items

Supporting students to keep it clean! - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Supporting students to keep it clean!

Ford Challenges University Students to be Social Entrepreneurs and Help Communities - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Ford Challenges University Students to be Social Entrepreneurs and Help Communities

Közösséget is épít a gesztenyesütés - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Közösséget is épít a gesztenyesütés

„Ki kell látnunk a gettón” – jön a Mérges Buddha - Badur Foundation
Normal view

„Ki kell látnunk a gettón” – jön a Mérges Buddha

Jason Banks: Managing Director of Re-covered - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Jason Banks: Managing Director of Re-covered

Cherie White: when an MSc is just the beginning… - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Cherie White: when an MSc is just the beginning…

Furniture at low, low prices! - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Furniture at low, low prices!

Nottingham Investing in the Sports Stars of Tomorrow - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Nottingham Investing in the Sports Stars of Tomorrow

Nottingham Potential opens its doors to the local community - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Nottingham Potential opens its doors to the local community

Hungary’s impoverished Roma fear for their children’s future - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Hungary’s impoverished Roma fear for their children’s future

Culture at a Crossroads - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Culture at a Crossroads

Szóval, rajzzal, játékkal - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Szóval, rajzzal, játékkal

Should I stay or should I go? - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Should I stay or should I go?

Exotic adventures with Green Talk: Laos Solar Water Purification System - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Exotic adventures with Green Talk: Laos Solar Water Purification System

Luang Prabang Temple Renovation - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Luang Prabang Temple Renovation

Uni prospects are boosted for thousands of poorer kids - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Uni prospects are boosted for thousands of poorer kids

Buddhist Traditions and Tak Bat in Luang Prabang - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Buddhist Traditions and Tak Bat in Luang Prabang

Opening a Workwear Factory - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Opening a Workwear Factory Harnessing the talent of the local community

Having successfully participated in the inaugural Springboard Programme, Badur Foundation awarded professional support to Let’s Help Each Other Association. The Association plans to open a workwear factory in the settlement of Pécs-Somogy in one of the most disadvantaged areas of Pécs city

The educational and employment indicators of Pécs-Somogy fall behind the city average: the unemployment rate is above 50% and 38% of the local inhabitants only finished primary school. The housing conditions are also significantly poorer in this settlement. Let’s Help Each Other Association has been present in the neighbourhood since 2003 and was successful in creating several clubs that have provided meaningful past time engagement for the local community such as as community gardening, cooking and sewing.

The professionalism of the participants in the sewing club was instrumental in inspiring the Association to look for business ideas that could lead to long-term and stable employment opportunities. Through the 2016 Springboard Programme, the Association received valuable professional support from NESsT to set out the business plan for a workwear factory in Pécs-Somogy.

To detail the business plan, Badur Foundation awarded further professional guidance in cooperation with NESsT so that the Association can secure the necessary capital and the factory can be opened in 2017.

Chestnut Processing in Pécsbánya - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Chestnut Processing in Pécsbánya Creating employment opportunities in Pécsbánya settlement

Once characterised by a prosperous miner community, Pécsbánya has been caught in a downward spiral for the past 25 years. The closure of the coal mines reorganized the social landscape of the neighbourhood. To find a solution to one of the most pressing local problems, unemployment, Pécsbányatelep Cultural Association proposed to make use of the chestnut fields surrounding the local cultural centre.

Currently, the local community is divided into three distinct groups: ageing miners, Roma families affected by deep poverty and newly arrived settlers, many of which are highly educated. To redefine the neighbourhood’s identity and bring it back to prosperity, Pécsbányatelep Cultural Association was created in 2011. The Association has been active in several fields: they have organised cultural events, engaged in community work, and offered skills training to the local inhabitants.

As one of the winners of the 2016 Springboard Programme, the Association was awarded funding by Badur to install two roasted chestnut stalls in Pécs. The raw chestnuts are partially sourced from the fields surrounding the local cultural centre, which has a two-fold benefit. First, it provides raw material at a competitive price for the venture, and second, several local families can be given the opportunity to earn significant supplementary income from picking the chestnuts. The inauguration of the roasted chestnut stalls was organised on October 8, 2016 within the framework of the local Chestnut Festival, and ever since the two stalls have been successfully operating. The neterprise already reached break-even in the first year and it has provided much needed work opportunities for five local community members, who managed the preparation and selling of chestnuts.

The set-up of the mobile chestnut stalls was just the first step. The Association has more ambitious goals; they would like to open a chestnut flour factory. To enable this, the Association continues to receive professional support from Badur in cooperation with NESsT so that they can detail their business plan and the factory can be opened in 2017/2018.

All in all, these two initiatives will generate stable employment opportunities for the local families, who will be able to take part in the picking, selling and processing of chestnuts.

Read more about the development of this initiative on the Chestnut project’s website.

Pécsbányatelep Cultural Association and Chestnut Social Cooperative - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Pécsbányatelep Cultural Association and Chestnut Social Cooperative

Let’s Help Each Other Association and Social Cooperative - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Let’s Help Each Other Association and Social Cooperative

Impact Accelerator - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Impact Accelerator

Cseriti - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Cseriti

Nottingham Potential - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Nottingham Potential

Re-covered - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Re-covered

Erzsébet Gulyas - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Erzsébet Gulyas

Judit Koppany - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Judit Koppany

Csaba Barta - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Csaba Barta

Judit Durst - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Judit Durst

Daniel Hallgarten - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Daniel Hallgarten

Zsombor Barta - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Zsombor Barta

amari - Badur Foundation
Normal view

amari

Chestnut - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Chestnut

After-school in Bátonyterenye - Badur Foundation
Normal view

After-school in Bátonyterenye Increased access to quality education and a much needed space for integration

The Association of Roma Minority Representatives and Spokespeople of Nógrád County has been undertaking vital community work in the Northern Hungarian region since 1996. A permanent community space will now ensure that they can carry on and diversify their educational services, thereby creating a space for integration for children from all walks of life.

Since its establishment, the main mission of the Association of Roma Minority Representatives and Spokespeople of Nógrád County has been to reduce child poverty through providing assistance to families in need. Their activities target both children and parents. They offer learning support and leisure time activities to children and organise training, employment opportunities and community events for adults. Due to its long term presence and diverse activities, the Association has become strongly embedded in the local community. They have a wide regional focus and actively support families living in Bátonyterenye, Mátraverebély and Lucfalva.

The central and thriving hub of the Association had been its headquarter in Bátonyterenye. The building was open all year on a daily basis from Monday to Saturday to serve the needs of parents and children alike. Social workers attended the administrative and social issues of the families in the morning, and in the afternoon children took part in the after-school to receive homework tutoring and enjoy diverse activities aimed at skills development. The Association organised music, photography, radio courses to provide meaningful past time activities for the children.

Unfortunately, the lease contract of the Association ended in 2016 summer, which put the very existence of the Association into question. With the support of Badur Foundation, a new building was acquired which is envisioned to become a stable base. The building was renovated and the new community centre was opened in December 2016. This investment is the first and very important strategic step towards increased sustainability.

In addition, the Association also plans to increase the reach of its children activities to generate own income. IT courses, English programmes, music and sport activities may appeal to fee-paying children from middle class families while also providing skills development opportunities to the Association’s main target group, children in need. Offering more programs which are attractive to families with higher social and economical status not only provides an extra source of income for the Association, but it will also create a much needed space for integration of children coming from diverse backgrounds.

Antiracism Education Workshops - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Antiracism Education Workshops Interactive workshops to foster mutual and lasting understanding among young people

Racism and discrimination towards the Roma community is currently increasing among younger people in Hungary. Tackling this rising discrimination is a difficult problem. However trying to change the attitudes among non-Roma young adults is a way to reshape how the Roma community will be treated in the future.

In 2013 the Foundation funded a series of antiracism education workshops for secondary schools in Hungary, delivered by the Independent Theatre (“IT”). This organisation has been creating and performing theatre plays for nearly ten years that primarily focus on social issues. Their play “Feather Picking” is based on documented personal stories, legal cases and hate crimes afflicting both Roma and non-Roma people.

This year the Foundation is currently funding another series of workshops with the programme expanding its scope to include universities, in particular students of professions which in the future will work with Roma communities e.g. teachers, social workers and health workers. The objective of the workshops is to educate and engage with young people illustrating the challenges faced by their peers within the Roma community and hopefully helping them to better understand the social issues. The two part workshops are interactive using peer Roma and non-Roma trainers, so that the participants feel more comfortable expressing their views around racism, discrimination and the Roma community with those of a similar age.

The 2014/15 programme will also include community actions, which with the support of IT trainers, will be developed and implemented by the students who have taken part in the workshops. The community actions will focus on social issues and disseminate the message of the workshops to a wider audience through creative projects such as public art or community theatre. Through the community action projects the young people will learn to work together and build their social citizenship.

The Feather Picking project has been awarded a 2014 Social Marie Prize for social innovation. The project was selected out of 35 nominated projects from across Austria, Hungary and the Czech Republic.

For more information on the play “Feather Picking” and the Independent Theatre please click here.

Association of Roma Minority Representatives and Spokespeople of Nógrád County - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Association of Roma Minority Representatives and Spokespeople of Nógrád County

Mahájána Foundation - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Mahájána Foundation

Jai Bhim Buddhist Network - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Jai Bhim Buddhist Network

Bio-briquette Production - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Bio-briquette Production Programme to alleviate energy poverty

Energy poverty is one of the key factors that keeps disadvantaged communities in extreme destitution. According to Habitat Hungary (2015), 946 thousand people could not properly heat their homes during the wintertime due to financial issues. To break this vicious trend, several communities have experimented with bio-briquette production to see if bio-briquettes could be an alternative and cheap heating source.

As these programmes have been set up independently from each other, no conclusive results have been produced on the overall sustainability and efficiency. This project aims to fill in this gap by closely following and measuring manufacturing and usage in five different communities so that the equipment can be tested and the most efficient processes can be identified. To support the initiative, Badur Foundation has provided the necessary equipment (pulp mixer and press) to five partner NGOs. In close cooperation with our partners, we also document production practices, collect and analyse data and share best practices across the five localities. Our ultimate aim is to find out whether bio-briquette manufacturing can be a standalone and sustainable project to alleviate energy poverty.

Partners:

Springboard Programme - 2016 - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Springboard Programme - 2016 Developing and supporting social enterprises

In February 2016 a Social Enterprise Competition was launched in cooperation with NESsT to identify and develop social enterprises that improve the employment chances and livelihood of people in deep poverty.

Having evaluated dozens of written applicatons, four organisations were selected to receive intensive capacity-building and mentoring throughout the spring and summer of 2016. After presenting their detailed business plans, two promising projects were identified to receive further financial and/or professional support in cooperation with NESsT.

Pécsbányatelep Cultural Association was awarded funding to install two roasted chestnut stalls in Pécs, thereby creating employment opportunities for local inhabitants. In addition, they were awarded continuous professional support to detail their business plan of a chestnut flour factory.

Badur also awarded further professional support to Let’s Help Each Other Association, which plans to open a workwear factory in the settlement of Pécs-Somogy in 2017.

Read more:

- Chestnut Processing in Pécsbánya

- Opening a Work Wear Factory

Food Products Social Enterprise - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Food Products Social Enterprise Jam making and food processing

Over the past fourteen years the Pearl Foundation has been operating in Eastern Hungary, in the Berettyóújfalu district. Originally the Foundation developed an education-based integration method to improve the life chances of the predominantly Romani population. In order to break the vicious cycle of poverty Pearl has initiated a food processing social enterprise to create jobs and develop the employability skills of the participants.

Pearl’s activities in this district are vitally important as there is a high unemployment rate, lack of infrastructure and no service industry which might provide jobs to locals. Families here live in deep poverty and are locked in a vicious cycle faced with no economic opportunities combined with low education and skill levels. Some are involved in low paid public work programmes run by the government but the majority of adults are in long term unemployment. There are grandmothers and grandfathers in families who have never been employed during their lives.

Children coming from these poor families and segregated areas have extremely limited opportunities to receive quality education let alone any future social mobility. The Foundation began working with Pearl in 2014 supporting an agricultural social enterprise where the community grew medical plants and collected wild herbs. Integrating the experiences from this project and developing the concept, Pearl has developed a food processing social enterprise where the members of the local community will produce jam, vegetable chips and other food products for sale. The Foundation is supporting the social enterprise through a grant where part will be used towards renovating a building, the kitchen factory, and part as a contribution towards professional consultancy to lead the project.

Based on local jam making traditions retained within the community and supplemented with their own research, Pearl has started to produce jam made from rose-hip and sloe berries foraged locally. Volunteers involved in the project over the past year have been testing different methods of processing berries and producing jams.

Pearl has taken a holistic approach to improve the opportunities for Roma living in poverty and this follows three intervention strands. Firstly, education programmes which include individualized after-school activities and scholarship programmes for children. Secondly, family support and community building programmes which cover crisis intervention, job creation, citizenship education and empowerment. Thirdly, Pearl focuses on how their model is working by recording the adaptable elements and sharing good practices and cooperating with other institutions so that collectively there is a group nationally with the same aim of alleviating poverty.

Working in conjunction with Pearl’s art project, this social enterprise has created and developed a brand name called Amari Food. There is an attractive packaging and design to market the brand: “Amari will become a brand of hand-made products made of natural materials with authentic tastes providing employment opportunities for local people building on local characteristics.”

Dr Ambedkar Secondary School - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Dr Ambedkar Secondary School Creating a new school in Miskolc

For the past eight years, the Jai Bhim Triratna Buddhist Network (the "Network") has been working successfully in the towns of Sajókaza and Alsózsolca in North Eastern Hungary. The Network established a rural secondary school named after Dr Ambedkar, an Indian reformer who inspired the Modern Buddhist Movement, promoted education to the untouchables and campaigned against social discrimination. With the support of the Foundation the Jai Bhim Network established a new Dr. Ambedkar School in the city of Miskolc which will provide non-segregated and high-quality education to disadvantaged Roma and non-Roma youngsters. The new school building will enable further students from small, rural and segregated villages to continue their secondary education with the aim to attain graduation and thereafter the chance to progress to university.

In the most disadvantaged region of North Eastern Hungary, there is typically no route for students of Roma background from segregated primary schools to progress to middle and higher education. This is partly due to the low standard of education they receive at primary level plus the fact that students derive from poor families who do not have the financial means to travel to the nearest city where the majority of good middle and higher education institutions are based, or to buy books and school supplies, or to pay the fees. In segregated neighbourhoods like Sajókaza, only a handful of students continue their studies on to secondary schools and pass the matriculation (A-level) exam. The expectations for the remaining young people are low and from the age of sixteen (mandatory school age in Hungary) the future is bleak with the only prospects being long term unemployment, participation in a low paid government work programmes or in some cases, involvement in prostitution and crime.

The mission of the Jai Bhim Network is to enable marginalised communities overrepresented by Roma to change their social and economic status within Hungarian society. The project team realised a number of years ago that the way to achieve their long term goals would be by providing quality education to some of the most disadvantaged youngsters in Hungary. Their starting point was establishing the first Dr Ambedkar Grammar School in Sajókaza. The team had been working together for twenty years on successful Roma educational initiatives, such as the Gandhi High School and Collegium Martineum in Baranya County. Their success is measured by many of their former students now occupying prestigious jobs in Hungary and all over Europe despite growing up in a “slum”.

The essence of their educational methods is empowerment, following the original methodology of Dr Ambedkar. The teachers use alternative teaching methods (such as Waldorf, Freinet) but adhere to official secondary-school requirements and curriculum. Aside from building up the basic missing skills, the classes seek to broaden the students horizons where they learn to express their personal point of view on general public issues. Thus apart from the highly disadvantaged, mostly Roma youngsters, Dr Ambedkar Schools target those who are looking for an alternative form of teaching.

In spite of positive aspects of operating such a school in an urban environment, up to 2016 the Jai Bhim Network have due to a lack of financial resources been unable to establish a Dr Ambedkar School in any larger town or city. The team has been working successfully in smaller towns, such as Sajókaza and Alsózsolca. In 2016 however with the support of the Foundation through a capital grant, the Jai Bhim Network acquired a building that was converted into a Dr Ambedkar School, right in the city of Miskolc. The day to day operational costs of the school are financed by the local government. For the the first time, it will be possible to provide non-segregated, high quality education for disadvantaged Roma and non Roma youth, and for those who are looking for an alternative type of education Hungary’s third largest city.

The city is the centre of Borsod County where the more talented students from smaller surrounding towns and segregated settlements will be able to attend the school. This school has the potential to provide numerous opportunities for disadvantaged students to gain social and cultural capital, access to qualified teachers, universities, theatres, governmental organisations and life in the wider world.

Community Centre in Csörög - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Community Centre in Csörög A place to host the Tanoda tutoring and education programme

Following the success of the the Community Garden project, the Foundation lent its support to the Mahájána Foundation to establish a Community Centre. The centre provides a stable environment for tutoring of disadvantaged children. It also intends to become a space for other community activities such as gardening and bio-briquette production.

The primary aims of Mahájána as an organisation are to develop the educational activities of disadvantaged pre- and primary school children from the Csörög area. Alongside these activities, Mahájána has also put great emphasis on maintaining close relationships with the parents of the children by holding regular meetings with them to ensure they have fully involved in the decision making and activities affecting thier children. It’s an important bond to forge. A by-product of working with the children has been that Mahájána can provide dedicated programmes that will help the parents to increase their skills for employment. This holistic approach taken by Mahájána of working with the community aims to break the vicious circle of poverty and increase the prospects for social mobility of the children.

Prior to Mahájána`s presence in Csörög, many of the children and youth had no access to any organised activities or a place where they could spend time in a useful and meaningful way. Without Mahájána providing this type of space and activities, young people were more likely to experiment with unsafe and dangerous behaviour, such as drugs and alcohol.

In addition to the education and tutoring programmes, Mahájána has also initiated a number of community projects such as another community garden which is used as a tool for education on nutrition, cheese processing project and biomass briquette production. The latter hopes to decrease the burden of heating during the wintertime. As part of community development several public events such as concerts and celebrations have been held within the centre. These community events provide alternative social interactions and motivates families to participate more in overall community life.

The initial support for the Community Centre came from the local government as they provided the physical facility. Unfortunately this support was withdrawn and hence placed the operations of Mahájána and their projects into jeopardy. Therefore in order to provide Mahájána with some longer term stability, the Foundation has provided a grant to enable them to purchase a building and set up a community centre.

The community centre provides the infrastructure for the Mahájána to sustain their operations and also be a place for long term educational, mentoring and cultural programmes. Mahájána hopes that the centre will re-energise and nurture community life, in the belief it has the possibility to become a community space where spontaneous and self-organised community events can take place.

Community Garden in Csörög - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Community Garden in Csörög Community project providing "learn to grow" skills to adults and children

Over the past three years, the Mahájána Foundation (Mahájána) has been primarily working with Roma children in Csörög, a disadvantaged community situated 37km north of Budapest. The community garden project was set up with the aim of providing work experience for unemployed adults and useful activities for the local children.

20% of Csörög’s population are Roma, one of the largest proportion in the region. With a high rate of unemployment, opportunities for long term and secure employment are scarce. Local infrastructure and services are poor: roads remain unfinished and there is no local school.Mahájána has been running tutoring programmes to help the local Roma children raise their standard of education enabling them to meet basic school requirements and also help improve their chances of progressing into higher education. In order to help improve the living standards of the children’s families, Mahájána has also initiated a number of community projects. For example, a biomass briquette project which provides a cheap and renewable source of fuel for cooking and heating, one of the major problems facing families, especially during the winter.

The community garden project was set up to become a space where unemployed adults can learn new skills and local Roma children can take part in useful activities over the weekends. Access to physical activity opportunities and nutrition education is limited in the community. Both the adults and children involved in the project learn “how to grow” skills and cultivate their own small parcels of land. The community members will use the produce grown as a source of fresh, healthy food for their families which they would not be able to afford otherwise.

Mahájána believe their role is to help the community kick ­start the project by providing regular training through the growing cycle and thereafter act in a supporting coordinator role. It is their view that this is very much a community led project with members driving the decision making process.

Before the community garden was created, many of the children had no access to activities at the weekends, a time when young people are more likely to experiment with unsafe and dangerous behaviour, such as drugs and alcohol. By providing the children an alternative, the community garden can help steer them in healthier directions. For those involved, working in the garden has developed a spirit of teamwork and work ethic and has motivated families to participate more in general community life.

The Foundation’s funding has helped to purchase the necessary materials for the garden. The project not only looks to provide education and other skills but seeks to address social issues such as family and community values in the hope it can re­-energise this disadvantaged community.

Re-covered - Badur Foundation
Normal view

Re-covered Creating employment and providing affordable recycled furniture

Badur Foundation is proud to have recently funded the incubation of Re-covered, enabling the Nottingham-based and student-led social enterprise to hit sales of £10,000 in just over a year. Re-covered aims to create employment and to provide affordable furnishing for vulnerable adults in Nottingham through recycling waste furniture.

Badur’s grant was used to purchase essential trading materials, a vehicle and insurances associated with the furniture re-purposing venture. Re-covered was able to start trading in May 2015. Sales figures have increased by an average of 22% per month. As relationships with local housing associations strengthen, a new website has been launched and due to the on-going dedication of the enterprise’s student-led team, Re-covered is going from strength to strength. It has become the cheapest furniture option to low-income households in Nottingham and - in 2016 - was a participant of the Enactus UK social enterprise championships, semi-finals of the Enactus World Cup in Toronto.

One of Re-covered’s founders, Cherie White – a University of Nottingham alumna - has remarked that “the funds from Badur Foundation have … dramatically improved our efficiency and … allowed us to break even on running costs each week.”

Re-covered has had 16 paid staff members since its conception. Employees join as part of a paid work placement and are trained up by one permanent member of staff – an experienced furniture restorer. Re-covered has partnered with local furniture organisations who are able to employ them on a permanent basis thereafter.

Re-covered’s directors estimate that the enterprise has saved customers around £49,000 and Nottingham Council £68,000. Re-covered has now established a partnership with Nottingham Credit Union to provide credit options to customers. With 45,000 social houses in Nottingham alone, there appears to be significant potential for the social enterprise to continue to grow.

Recovered was born out of the international Enactus programme, in which The University of Nottingham participates. Enactus is an international non-profit organisation dedicated to inspiring students to improve the world through entrepreneurial action. It provides a platform for teams of outstanding university students to create community development projects that put people’s own ingenuity and talents at the centre of improving their livelihoods.

Re-covered employs and trains vulnerable adults to refurbish and recycle waste furniture, which can then be sold at a discounted price to local housing association tenants. Housing associations must - by law - remove all furniture from premises including carpets and curtains prior to a new tenant taking possession of the property. A typical tenant is someone on the verge of homelessness, has little or no furniture and also little disposable income with which to purchase necessities such as beds, chairs etc. In some cases, it may lead to tenants turning to pay day loans and debt to finance their furniture.

Nottingham City Council has historically sent around 850 items of furniture each week to be crushed and added to landfill sites. In addition to its social impact through employment and furniture affordability, Re-covered is therefore helping social services to reduce this landfill, mitigate CO2 emissions and save on t