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Sector mapping SECTOR MAPPING OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES

Romaversitas Foundation has initiated a sector mapping overview in order to identify and scrutinise existing educational programmes that support Roma and/or disadvantaged students. The goal of the sector mapping is to promote cooperation that safeguards, strengthens and expands the long-term social impact of these organisations.

The sector mapping focuses on organisations that help Roma and/or disadvantaged young people in the field of education. The aim of the research is to map out what kind of programmes and mentoring opportunities are available for students throughout their journey from early childhood to the age of 35.

The research collects data about the target groups of the initiatives by age, as well as on their geographical coverage. Moreover, the sector mapping examines methodologies and best practices that could be adopted in areas where support is not currently available for disadvantaged students.

The long-term goal of the sector mapping is to encourage partnerships and foster collaborations between non-profit organisations, in order to decrease the dropout rate for disadvantaged students at different educational stages and to support them throughout their careers to achieve their academic goals.

The research gathers information about the existing programmes through questionnaires, as well as conducting and analysing interviews with experts in the field and professionals from non-profit organisations. One of the short-term goals of the mapping is to establish a CRM system with an open data source, which can be accessed by organisations who are looking for partnerships to
achieve their long-term social impact in a more effective and efficient way.

In the first phase of the research, a questionnaire has been disseminated. The questionnaire is available via the following link.

The research is conducted by Absolute Giving Nonprofit Ltd. in collaboration with CEU Romani Studies Program and Badur Foundation.

Azért dolgozunk, hogy az ő gyerekeik már ne állami gondozottként nőjenek fel - Badur Foundation
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Azért dolgozunk, hogy az ő gyerekeik már ne állami gondozottként nőjenek fel

Mennyit tud egy nyolcaddikos cigány diák? - Badur Foundation
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Mennyit tud egy nyolcaddikos cigány diák?

https://telex.hu/belfold/2021/12/18/roma-diszkriminacio-lakhatas-alberlet-kereses - Badur Foundation
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https://telex.hu/belfold/2021/12/18/roma-diszkriminacio-lakhatas-alberlet-kereses

Ezeknek a gyerekeknek a legfőbb igényük és vágyuk egy szerető család - törődés, bizalom gyerekszem - Badur Foundation
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Ezeknek a gyerekeknek a legfőbb igényük és vágyuk egy szerető család - törődés, bizalom gyerekszem

Olyan karácsonyi ajándékot adna, aminek van értelme és még jót is tesz vele? Adunk néhány tippet - Badur Foundation
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Olyan karácsonyi ajándékot adna, aminek van értelme és még jót is tesz vele? Adunk néhány tippet

Badur Foundation is looking to appoint a Country Manager in Hungary. - Badur Foundation
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Badur Foundation is looking to appoint a Country Manager in Hungary.

Smile For Life - Badur Foundation
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Smile For Life Putting a smile on the face of every disabled and disadvantaged youngster

Working in the North East of England, Smile For Life empowers children and young people with disabilities and learning difficulties to achieve their potential to live a full and happy life. With support from the Foundation, the charity will provide a chef apprenticeship for one of its young people at Café Beam in Gosforth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

Smile For Life supports young people with disabilities and learning difficulties in various ways. It provides equipment which makes their day-to-day lives easier, experiences that enable them to make memories and challenge themselves in new and exciting ways, and even help with bedroom and garden makeovers to create an environment which is more accessible and appropriate for their needs.

Young people can also attend the ‘Tuesday Club’, an accessible place for young people with a range of disabilities to come and keep active, make friends, and, above all, have fun. The social aspect of the club is invaluable; reducing isolation encouraging new friendships and improving their all-round wellbeing. The two-hour sessions include a range of accessible sports and games, as well as a quiet area for more relaxed activities. Every year, Smile For Life also hosts a residential ‘Challenge Weekend’ which provides the opportunity for many young people to travel away from home with their friends and enjoy new physical activities and valuable social time together.

The charity has evolved and grown greatly during the 12 years since it was established. As a result of research with professionals, parents and carers, and young people, it became very clear that there is a long-term problem in disabled young people gaining employment upon leaving school. This is due to many factors; lack of awareness amongst employers, lack of support for young people making the transition, no opportunities to gain experience and confidence, and the suitability of roles available in the local jobs market.

As a direct result of this finding, the charity’s café ‘Café Beam’ was established in 2014 on its small premises in Gosforth; a real workplace where it can offer placements to youngsters with disabilities and learning difficulties who need support with their transition from education into the world of work. Café Beam is a beautiful café/bistro which is run by a team of young people with a variety of disabilities and learning difficulties. These youngsters help to prepare all of the produce, serve customers, operate tills and handle money as well as welcoming many different members of the community both as volunteers and customers.

Outcomes to date at the café have been wide and varied: all of the young people have learned new skills which are transferable to many workplaces, they have gained real life work experience through maintaining high standards of customer service, handling money, taking orders using modern technology, and communicating effectively with colleagues and customers.

Unexpected outcomes have also been abundant; the increase in confidence and mental well being of the youngsters by having a meaningful role and being a valuable member of a team, the motivation to travel to the workplace independently has opened up a great freedom for many, and an increased social circle with many firm friendships developing between members of the team.

With support from the Foundation, Smile for Life now seeks to extend its provision by offering a chef apprenticeship at Café Beam. The chef apprenticeship will be based predominantly in the kitchen as a trainee chef, although front of house duties and the administration side of the industry will also be taught as part of the role.

The position will be for 30 hours per week over 18 months and will offer one to one support and training for a youngster with autism so that they will receive all necessary skills and knowledge to move into a full-time position when the 18 months are complete. At the end of the placement, depending on the capacity of the café and the interests of the young person, Smile For Life aims to either support them into paid employment or to hire them as a valued member of the Café Beam team!

Where the Green Grants Went 8 - Badur Foundation
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Where the Green Grants Went 8

Escape 2 Make - Badur Foundation
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Escape 2 Make Make friends, make things, make a difference.

Escape2Make aims to help 11-18s in the Lancaster and Morecambe area to escape from boredom, social media, loneliness and any pressure at school or home by providing workshops and short courses hosted by businesses, artists and students. All of the courses are free and are designed to help young people to build their confidence, whilst making a difference in their local communities.

Never before have young people so needed a service that enables them to escape the pressures of schoolwork, exams, home life, negative peer relationships and boredom. Never before has there been such a need to build interventions that help support poor mental health and wellbeing. Never before has there been so little available to address these needs.

Escape2Make (E2M) believes moving beyond the online world can promote emotional intelligence and empathy, and give space to explore and experiment so that young people can grow in confidence and resilience. E2M’s programmes also aim to support the growth of enterprising behaviour and attitudes, through active citizenship and meaningful youth-led projects.

E2M runs 15 creative projects for young people aged 11-18 over five weeks, ranging from baking and upcycling, through to music production and performance poetry. All of the projects result in youth-led events, including a mini Green Festival and cabaret.

As well as the 15 introductory projects, E2M aims to deliver more targeted support to the next generation of journalists, film makers, architects and conservationists. By delivering year-round activity to a smaller group of young people and by reaching those less advantaged, E2M aims to ignite the development of new skills, whilst providing an opportunity for young people to connect with like-minded peers.

Since E2M began in 2018:

- 443 young people have taken part in 34 free creative workshops across two pilots;

- 100% of attendees enjoyed the experience, while 94% reported they would not have had this opportunity were it not for the E2M programme;

- 99% said they felt an improved sense of wellbeing after taking part in the activities;

- 23 young people led an event to launch the charity and helped to write E2M’s business plan.

With support from the Foundation, E2M will deliver its ongoing Press Club for children and young people. The club is run fortnightly and aims to give young people an understanding of career paths in this area, whilst developing new skills, confidence and friendships. Going forward, E2M aims to expand its offer, running 2 major project each year as well as increasing its ongoing groups to 6 – including natural skills and yoga. E2M also seeks to explore the potential to expand and replicate its model into other parts of the country.

“E2M takes us away from school pressures and gives us a balance” Colette, aged 17

“Being able to try these new classes really opens up a whole new world” Matilda, aged 14

Wilder City - Badur Foundation
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Wilder City Creating spaces for urban wildlife

Wilder City works to create places for wildlife in the city by establishing a network of organisations and individuals committed to wildlife-friendly planting and low carbon garden practices. With support from the Foundation, it seeks to wild one square mile in Southwark, central London, by asking organisations and individuals to sign up to wildlife-friendly interventions.

The world has lost about 60% of wild vertebrates since 1970. Declines in insects (pollinators, detritus-eaters and foundations of carnivorous food chains) threaten to catastrophically destabilise global ecosystems. The UK is ‘among the most nature-depleted countries in the world,’ according to a 2016 report, with continuing declines in species such as skylarks, hedgehogs and many insects including butterflies. Only 8.5% of land is protected for wildlife, and only 40% of that is in good condition. As part of the efforts to restore biodiversity, we need to make sure that urban land is ‘wilded’.

Wilding is as much about soil restoration, flood mitigation, water and air purification, carbon sequestration and pollination as it is about more space for nature. However, rewilding and wilding can be a hard sell. Humans don’t like mess or uncertainty, and natural systems are dynamic, complex, untidy, and erratic. These are the characteristics that bring diversity and resilience. We must learn to read their inconvenience as a sign that all is well. We should be embracing the mess.

To address this challenge, Wilder seeks to make organisations and individuals aware of the benefits of creating wildlife gardens, as we need to start to live in harmony with nature. At a local scale, a window box can grow native wildflowers, which support local pollinators, and boxes for birds, bats and bees can be installed on most buildings. Wilder supports education in wilding practices, and policy change to shift city dwellers towards a flourishing relationship with nature.

Wilder’s goal is to wild one square mile in Southwark, central London by creating a network of people, projects and companies all committed to improving biodiversity. This could be anything from transforming a concrete space into a wildlife garden to putting up a bird box or building a pallet planter and filling it with butterfly friendly plants. No intervention is too small.

With support from the Foundation towards staff and project costs, Wilder aims to get at least 30 organisations and individuals to sign up to the Wilder Mile. It will offer tailored advice on how people can wild their space, and the team can also provide a design and/or planting service. Over a three-year period, Wilder plans to substantially improve biodiversity and air quality within one square mile and increase knowledge of wildlife-friendly practices. It hope this model will then be rolled out across other areas and other cities

Sole wild beaver colony threatened by sewage spills - Badur Foundation
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Sole wild beaver colony threatened by sewage spills

GREEN SCHOOLS PROJECT - Badur Foundation
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GREEN SCHOOLS PROJECT Developing environmentally aware, empowered young people

Green Schools Project works to improve environmental education in schools, and to equip children and young people with the knowledge and skills needed to build a more sustainable society. With support from the Foundation, it will pilot a remote programme that aims to enable schools across the country to reduce their carbon emissions and engage their students in environmental projects.

Young people growing up today will have to live with the consequences of climate change and as demonstrated by the global school strikes, if they are given the opportunity, they have the drive and determination to lead societal change. However, British schools are not always addressing this issue with the urgency it requires.

Green Schools Project was founded in 2015, in recognition that the depth of environmental education in schools was not sufficient to address the scale of the climate change challenge. Schools account for around 2% of the country’s total carbon emissions. Eliminating the emissions of one school, a group of schools or even the entire education system will make a small contribution to cutting the UK’s overall carbon emissions. But developing a generation of young people with the knowledge, skills, and experience to help drive the transition to a sustainable society will make a far greater contribution. This is Green Schools Project’s ultimate goal.

Green Schools Project has grown from 3 pilot schools in 2015, to running its programmes in 89 schools around the country. Their early work focused on supporting the development of school eco-teams and providing climate related teacher training. This work evolved into Zero Carbon Schools, a programme providing expert support to individual schools to reduce their carbon emissions and take their first steps towards zero emissions. The programme engages participating schools in efforts to:

  • Calculate their schools carbon footprint, in four key areas - energy, food, travel and purchasing.
  • Plan and implement projects to reduce these emissions.

Through Zero Carbon Schools, pupils are offered the opportunity to run various projects such as reducing energy usage, encouraging sustainable travel to school, and reducing carbon emissions associated with school food consumption. Beyond this, it delivers teacher training to support teachers to include climate and nature in the curriculum to make their lessons more meaningful. The programme also supports schools to organise events for parents which raise awareness about climate change and what everyone can do to help, developing the school into a community learning hub for how to create a zero-carbon future.

With support from the Badur Foundation, Green Schools Project will trial a new remote version of the Zero Carbon Schools programme, working with up to 50 schools around the UK. This lighter-touch version aims to enable schools around the country to reduce their emissions and engage students in environmental projects. Students at the 50 schools will be involved at all stages, calculating the schools’ carbon emissions, working out what the most effective steps would be to reduce them and carrying out activities which support these steps.

The remote Zero Carbon Schools programme aims to be a collaborative project where schools support each other and develop effective ways of working together. Through linking schools together, increasing collaboration and sharing learning on effective emissions reductions projects more widely, Green Schools Project’s aim is that schools across the UK will learn about the feasibility of and practical steps needed to move towards zero carbon emissions. The pilot will also be used to test the scalability and sustainability of the programme.

2020 Annual Report & Financial Statements - Badur Foundation
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2020 Annual Report & Financial Statements

Youth Realities - Badur Foundation
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Youth Realities

Plastic Free North Devon - Badur Foundation
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Plastic Free North Devon

Green Schools Project - Badur Foundation
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Green Schools Project

Enactus - Badur Foundation
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Enactus

Brookside Theatre - Badur Foundation
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Brookside Theatre

Apricot Centre - Badur Foundation
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Apricot Centre

New “second chance” community café to open at Newcastle Cathedral - Badur Foundation
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New “second chance” community café to open at Newcastle Cathedral

Council teams up with Plastic Free North Devon in new bin sticker campaign - Badur Foundation
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Council teams up with Plastic Free North Devon in new bin sticker campaign

„Cigány kisgyerekkel azt éreztetni, úgysem lesz belőled senki, az iszonyú!” - Csörögi Tanoda riport - Badur Foundation
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„Cigány kisgyerekkel azt éreztetni, úgysem lesz belőled senki, az iszonyú!” - Csörögi Tanoda riport

PLASTIC FREE NORTH DEVON - Badur Foundation
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PLASTIC FREE NORTH DEVON Protecting the environment through community-led action

Plastic Free North Devon inspires residents, tourists and businesses to drastically reduce their consumption of single-use plastic, remove it from the environment and dispose of it properly. With support from the Foundation, it will pilot an environmental education project that aims to encourage a shift in society where people want to care about the environment and can help to protect it no matter the personal circumstance.

Plastic Free North Devon (PFND) connects people with their natural surroundings through conversations, education and events to ensure residents and visitors alike want to protect what our very existence depends on. Through its work, PFND has identified the need to target those who do not see the environment as relevant to them, building on Sir David Attenborough’s recognition that ‘no one will protect what they don’t care about; and no one will care about what they have never experienced.’

Many young people in North Devon don’t have the opportunity to access surrounding areas of natural beauty and environmental importance because of variable social and economic issues that exist within our community. The environmental narrative that has recently become so apparent often has little significance to many individuals and families who rarely have the privilege of making environmentally conscious decisions.

This sits right at the heart of PFND’s campaign to increase care and stewardship over the natural world through education alongside real-life opportunities and experience. It seeks to deliver an engaging and informative education programme to local communities that:

  • Improves their understanding of the natural ocean environment and its importance by encouraging a life-long love of nature;
  • Introduces them to the main impacts of human activity on the planet;
  • Inspires further self-learning about nature and persuades them to make more sustainable lifestyle choices;
  • Encourages volunteering in northern Devon and beyond;
  • Encourages everyone to feel that they can be part of environmental conversation


The project will take a multi-layered approach through the following activities:

  1. 1. Community engagement using virtual reality technology to bring nature to local communities - building on successes achieved using this method already. This aims to ensure people are aware and inspired by what is in their own local area and how one intertwined ecosystem fits in with the next.
  2. 2. Real-life experiences for 16 secondary school students to visit Lundy and experience the wildlife and landscape themselves. This will be followed by a 7-week summer volunteering programme.
  3. 3. Paid ambassador roles, providing meaningful employment and experience for those seeking a career in the environmental sector.


Young people are incredibly important in trying to create a societal tipping point and they will (if society does its job correctly) be the growing voice that the planet so desperately needs. The delivery of the education to young people will specifically seek to:

  • Inspire through passionate and knowledgeable role models;
  • Include the role of science in understanding and protecting nature;
  • Provide information and links to learning organisations for continued engagement;
  • Share narratives about examples of how to get into conservation roles, the barriers and how to beat them down.


The Foundation provided support towards project coordination and equipment, experiences for young people and 1 of the ambassador roles. Beyond the pilot, PFND will evaluate learnings and use them to roll out the project further, evolving the films and activities as well as engaging with communities and partners more widely.

Youth Realities - Badur Foundation
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Youth Realities On a mission to educate, empower and support young people

Youth Realities is a youth-led organisation based in Barnet that addresses teenage relationship abuse through creative education and specialist, survivor-centred support. It has seen an increased demand for its services in response to COVID-19 and other additional challenges.

1 in 3 young people experience abuse from a partner, with 68% not receiving any support for their trauma. Domestic abuse has a social cost of £68 billion per year in the UK, and can be reduced through holistic, relationship-based and trauma-informed prevention work and sustainable, survivor-centred support services. Youth Realities (YR) aims to:

  • reduce abuse within teenage relationships
  • raise awareness through creative and inclusive education
  • empower young people’s personal development and growth
  • provide advocacy and trusted support for young survivors.


YR uses a feminist-led, intersectional model that is inclusive and centres on the safety, healing and experiences of young survivors, helping them rebuild their sense of self, resilience and empower them to move forward with their lives, free from violence and abuse. Youth Realities is based in Barnet, focusing on the pockets of poverty in the South West Localities, including Colindale and the Grahame Park Estate. COVID-19 has exacerbated the already challenging environments young people were living in, and being able to engage in YR’s work provides them with the guidance and support needed to navigate through the difficulties they are facing.

YR offers a range of provision including 1:1 support for young survivors of abuse, trauma, violence, exploitation and other adversity. It also runs a weekly dance, fitness and confidence building programme for young women aged 12-25, and a 15-week programme targeted at young men, helping them to shape themselves into happy, healthier and resilient young adults.

With support from the Foundation and others, YR seeks to sustain the increased demand for its services in response to COVID and other additional challenges, including a significant increase in domestic violence and abuse, youth violence, exacerbated mental health challenges, increased poverty and familial challenges, and increased social anxiety. It has also moved premises as feedback showed some women felt increasingly unsafe when leaving its existing premises at night, due to poor street lighting. The Foundation provided support towards equipment for the new rented venue, which is a short walk away.

YR aims to continue offering support at the current level, working with high-need and vulnerable young people and supporting them to feel happier, healthier and safer. In the medium-term, YR is researching the potential to replicate its work in neighbouring Boroughs.

Youth Realities took me in and transformed my story of being a victim to being a survivor. She [my youth worker] provided me with endless life changing opportunities, using my story and educating myself on domestic abuse in order not only to help myself but others. She brought out a totally different side of me, the side that had been lost and destroyed due to my past experiences. I began to realise my worth and potential, slowly my life began to turn back to normal, school life, family life and reconnected with old friendships.” Young Survivor

Brookside Theatre - Badur Foundation
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Brookside Theatre A theatre for the community, run by the community

Recognising the importance of engagement with the arts for children and young people, Brookside Theatre seeks to develop a sustainable programme of productions aimed at younger audiences. With support from the Foundation, it will deliver an inaugural production of The Tale of Peter Rabbit, aimed at local children and their families.

Brookside Theatre is a community driven, 194-seat arts venue in Romford, which focuses on promoting and developing the arts by presenting a diverse, high quality programme of events and activities of national and local origin. The Theatre aims to entertain, enrich, inspire and educate the community by providing a theatrical experience that is both accessible and affordable, as well as facilitating social interaction and the chance to meet and engage with others.

In 2018, research found that children who have an interest or involvement in the performance arts are up to four times more likely to be recognised for their academic achievements and possess enhanced cognitive, motor and social skills. Participation in the arts also has a number of well-known benefits, from building confidence and developing communication skills through to increasing creativity and well-being. Locally, there has always been an inarguable lack of theatre productions aimed at young people. Brookside Theatre aims to change this by enriching the lives of the young people in the community and providing a sense of empowerment, escape and fun. Its initial youth production will be of The Tale of Peter Rabbit, a new musical adaptation based on one of Beatrix Potter’s most loved and endeared tales.

“Handed down from generation to generation, the story of the cheeky Peter Rabbit holds a special place in our hearts, so whether you’re looking for a hug of nostalgia or the perfect introduction to one of Beatrix Potter’s most famous tales, this is a truly charming production for the whole family to enjoy together; an enchanting experience for young and old alike.”

Each production will culminate in a workshop for young audience members, offering the invaluable opportunity for participation as well as the chance to meet members of the cast. The opportunity for participation will be offered to local schools and other educational practises and the workshops will be facilitated by the Theatre and industry professionals.

With support from the Foundation, the Theatre will trial subsidised tickets prices for the production alongside free tickets to financially disadvantaged families. This important first production aims to test the sustainability of the model going forward and the potential for Brookside Theatre to offer a programme of affordable youth productions. When deciding upon future productions, the Theatre will consult young people, local schools and the education authority in order to ascertain which productions will serve to aid the current school curriculum, whilst being accessible to all.

Visit Brookside Theatre’s website to find out more about the production, including timings and ticket details.

Apricot Centre - Badur Foundation
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Apricot Centre Helping young people affected by the impact of leaving care

The Apricot Centre runs a diverse farm and well-being service, recognising the important link between the well-being of the soil, food and habitat, and the mental and physical health of the people in and around it. With support from the Foundation, it will deliver a nature well-being project that aims to help young people affected by suicidal thoughts, anxiety and mental health issues due to the impact of leaving care.

The Apricot Centre is a social enterprise and farm based at Huxham’s Cross in South Devon, growing a wide range of Biodynamic and Organic produce. On the farm, the team runs a well-being service, providing therapeutic support for families and children, using the farm and nature as a co-therapist. The centre offers a rich experience for children and their families, providing mentoring for young people with specific needs such as special education, behaviour or mental health.

The ‘Root to Rise’ project seeks to help young people affected by the impact of leaving care, whether that is foster care, adoption placements that have broken down, or children’s homes. There is currently a gap in services for young people transitioning from care into independent adult living. These young people often slip through the net and can find themselves isolated or turning to addiction, negative thoughts and tendencies, or are unable to move forward in their lives because of their traumatic childhood.

Root to Rise is an intensive two-day course using sustainable development and therapeutically underpinned nature-based activities to playfully explore the practical and emotional resources required to navigate such transitions. Through the project, young people are actively encouraged to reconnect with nature, find their voice and become a part of a community of like-minded young people. Whilst helping to improve physical, emotional and mental health, the project combines well-being activities and therapeutic support in a nature-based setting.

During the two days there are opportunities to try out:

  • Sustainable development and nature-based skills, and discover how nature can be the greatest ‘life’ teacher.
  • A safe place to reflect privately or openly how these new skills and/or ‘nature’s lessons’ relate to personal life experiences.
  • An opportunity to explore how these ‘life’ lessons and individual reflections can be applied outside of the project.


Whilst the project will provide an intensive two-day course, the team will also use this as an opportunity to engage young people in other services they require, as many young people identified would benefit from regular group or individual therapy. The project aims to be the springboard for young people into accessing support as an adult and making positive steps forward in their lives.

Thomas (looked after young person – living independently):
“… really good that we can have the opportunity to share our experience and improve things for other young people leaving care – liked being given the opportunity to make something out of wood and use the tools.”

Barefoot Kitchen - Badur Foundation
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Barefoot Kitchen Plot to plate projects for people, places and the planet

Barefoot Kitchen is a social enterprise that works at a grassroots level to create regenerative and resilient communities in the Tees Valley through food growing, cooking and sharing initiatives – from plot to plate. It seeks to build on this work by creating a new community growing site for local people in Middlesbrough.

Barefoot Kitchen provides support and expertise on a range of projects, from redistributing surplus food or turning an unloved garden into a productive space for food growing, to leading wild food walks and working with local communities to improve their surroundings. All of its work aims to help Middlesbrough’s communities become resilient to food access, affordability, and quality challenges arising from climate change, health crises, poverty and discrimination – to be food resilient.

Middlesbrough is one of the twenty most deprived authorities in England, with 40% of children living in poverty and since the March 2020 lockdown, 50% of children receiving Free School Meals reported a significant drop in their intake of fruit and vegetables.

Operating at a grassroots level, the Fig Alleys is a new community ‘plot to plate’ site, situated in the western fringe of Middlesbrough in the Ayresome ward. The Fig Alleys site area has a long history of food growing and until the 1990s, included a large allotment site known locally as ‘The Pig Alleys.’ This has now been removed and the Fig Alleys project aims to restore some of the opportunities and community spirit that the original site provided for local people.

The Foundation provided support towards the items and equipment needed for the new site, including a wooden greenhouse, irrigation system, groundworks and crop protection.

Key aims of the project include:

  • Providing fresh fruit and vegetables to local households to improve food resilience;
  • Providing opportunities for local people to learn about and engage with food, including growing, cooking and sharing, whilst demonstrating ideas they can replicate at home;
  • Supporting the physical and mental well being of people visiting the Fig Alleys and creating a community network.
Single Mother Opens Community Cafe During Lockdown for Local Families - Badur Foundation
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Single Mother Opens Community Cafe During Lockdown for Local Families

Community project uses bread baking to connect with disadvantaged communities - Badur Foundation
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Community project uses bread baking to connect with disadvantaged communities

Dr. Ambedkar Secondary School - Badur Foundation
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Dr. Ambedkar Secondary School Supporting organisational development and financial stabilisation

With capital development support from the Foundation, the Jai Bhim Network established a new high school in Miskolc in order to provide high-quality education to disadvantaged young people. The school aimed to enable students from small, segregated villages to continue their education and ultimately progress to university.

The first year of the school’s operation (2016/2017) proved to be a great success. The school increased its student numbers, improved student retention, hired additional qualified teachers and established new educational partnerships. (Read more about the background of the project and the initial results here.)

Unfortunately, contextual factors made it challenging to operate the grammar school in a sustainable way. Disadvantaged young people were increasingly choosing to pursue vocational routes over grammar education, due to state scholarships provided exclusively in vocational schools. The continous drop in student numbers began to cause a serious financial deficit for the school.

A potential solution arose when the Hungarian educational authorities invited the school to participate in its „technikum” (NVQ) pilot programme that would offer an opportunity for students to complete their A-levels as well as gaining a vocational qualification. Importantly, the school could also offer financial support to enrolled students. The pilot started with a preparatory year in 2019, aiming to become fully operational from 2020 onwards.

The school continued to support grammar students whilst it integrated into the new programme. Unfortunately, due to a series of delays and legislative issues, full integration was pushed back a year. At the same time, the financial support previously provided by the government to help disadvantaged grammar students was withdrawn, meaning the school incurred additional costs for this provision (e.g. extra meals, transport, mentoring support etc.). These events caused a significant deficit in the school’s budget for 2020/2021 and led to crisis management measures being taken.

The Foundation provided professional support throughout this process, along with financial support to cover the costs of a financial audit and the recuitment of a Chief Operating Officer (COO). The audit aims to provide a reliable, independent assessment of the financial standing of the school, which will form an important element of its stability planning. Going forward, the COO will manage the financial stability of the school, as well as implementing fundraising activities, optimising internal processes, and liaising with external partners.

Photo credit: Facebook page of Dr. Ambedkar School

Banner photo credit: Northfolk on Unsplash

T-TUDOK - Badur Foundation
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T-TUDOK

CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAMME - Badur Foundation
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CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAMME PILOT IN A SCHOOL TEACHING VULNERABLE STUDENTS IN A SUBURBAN AREA OF BUDAPEST

Creative Partnerships Programme (CPP) is a creative learning programme that aims to develop young people’s creativity and critical thinking as well as to increase the effectiveness of teaching and learning in school. CPP trains artists to work with teachers and their students in their classrooms to bring about sustainable changes in the way teachers teach.

Within the Creative Partnership Programme, professional artists/art students (including painters, architects, graphic/industrial/textile designers, musicians etc.) assist teachers to create learning environments in which students are fully engaged and become „high functioning”.

„The whole child is engaged in the learning experience, not only aspects of their mental processes, but their bodies, their emotions and their social skills. It is this sense of being ‘high functioning’ which leads to feelings of wellbeing within the child, and this in turn builds the resilience and confidence which underpins successful learning.” Reference: CCE (2015) A Creative Partnerships Pilot Maths Programme in Pecs, Qualitative evaluation report, p. 11.

The programme is always adapted to the local needs. The collaboration between teachers and artists focuses on tackling local difficulties highlighted by the schools themselves (e.g. reducing the risk of disengagement, development of cooperative skills, managing disruptive behaviour). The impact of the programme has been confirmed by international research done by Cambridge University and OECD.

“In one school, children were given big sheets of paper and asked to draw outlines of parts of their bodies which they then measured and used for other calculations. One girl, who generally remains detached from maths learning, became very absorbed in this task, experimenting with different ways of completing this task in a remarkably inventive way. This allowed her to explore the idea with her curiosity and imagination combined…. All the teachers reported that designing more physically active maths lessons had improved concentration and learning.” Reference: Collard et. al (2015) Creating creative learning environments by Creative Partnerships Programme - Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics Programme in Pécs, p. 7.

Since 2002 – when CPP was introduced in the UK- 14 countries have adopted the programme, including Hungary. In 2013, the first Hungarian pilot was started by T-Tudok in collaboration with Creativity, Culture and Education (UK), the Faculty of Music and Visual Arts of the University of Pécs and 7 schools in Pécs (South-Hungary). After 3 years, the programme became sustainable and has been continuously running ever since. An important sustainability milestone was reached when the programme became integrated into the curricular offer of the Art University. Art students could participate in the programme as unpaid interns for school credit.

In 2020, a new pilot programme was started by T-Tudok in the suburban area of Budapest. Because of low rent prices in this area of Budapest (called Újpest), the number of highly disadvantaged children - who often come from Eastern Hungary- has recently increased in a music primary school. The school was struggling to fully accommodate the needs of these students, as well as to bridge the gap between them and middle-class students so the headmaster welcomed collaboration with the CPP team. The introduction of CPP’s “highly functioning classroom” methodology aims to increase the quality of teaching in the school and help disadvantaged, lower-achieving children to be engaged, learn efficiently and to increase their academic performance.

The CPP pilot in the music primary school aims to last three years. The work completed in the first semester was funded from the school’s own resources. The Foundation provided co-funding for the second semester and will assist the team in their planning to secure additional funding for the subsequent years, along with establishing a partnership with an Art University in Budapest.

Banner photo credit: PeterF on Unsplash

Roma Theatre Retrospective 2020 - Badur Foundation
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Roma Theatre Retrospective 2020

Házhoz jönnek a roma hősök - Badur Foundation
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Házhoz jönnek a roma hősök

“With the Power of Humanity” Foundation - Badur Foundation
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“With the Power of Humanity” Foundation

Ethnic Talents - Badur Foundation
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Ethnic Talents

Flow Foundation - Badur Foundation
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Flow Foundation

Woodshed Workshop - Badur Foundation
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Woodshed Workshop

Make Your Way CIC - Badur Foundation
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Make Your Way CIC

Devon Environment Foundation (DEF) - Badur Foundation
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Devon Environment Foundation (DEF)

Big River Bakery - Badur Foundation
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Big River Bakery

Mentori támogatás társadalmi vállalkozás fejlesztő programban - Badur Foundation
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Mentori támogatás társadalmi vállalkozás fejlesztő programban

Big River Bakery, Teesside - Badur Foundation
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Big River Bakery, Teesside A community bakery supporting refugees in Middlesbrough

Big River Bakery is a social enterprise that seeks to create a system where quality local food is available and affordable to all. In partnership with Teesside University, it seeks to launch a new bakery creating a safe, welcoming place where refugees are empowered through work experience and training opportunities, whilst providing the local community with the best freshly baked bread.

Big River Bakery Teesside will be based within Teesside University’s start-up incubator, which is situated right on the University campus and in the heart of the local community. Although primarily for refugees, the bakery will also reach out to other disadvantaged groups in the local area.

Big River Bakery was established in the North East in 2013, with a focus on developing community led initiatives that build a sustainable and equitable food economy at a local level. At its bakery in Shieldfield - Newcastle, it runs a baking and barista themed employability programme for local people furthest from the job market, as well as providing employment for people with disabilities.

The short-term aim of the Teesside bakery is to be a central hub for community bake days, courses in bread making, along with producing baked goods for local communities and running a subscription-based bread service. It aims to provide regular baking experience opportunities for at least 10 refugees, along with qualifications and training opportunities. The project will benefit from being immersed within a diverse, collaborative space with access to people with different types of business knowledge and skills, whilst Teesside University’s start-up platform will benefit from having a social enterprise within it. This cross pollination of cultures and ideas seeks to create value which goes well beyond that of simply baking bread.

Anna Lewis from Open Door North East described how the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted refugees and asylum seekers in the region:

“Our clients would benefit greatly from the safe provision of community space and meaningful activity. Our clients often and clearly express their desire to work whilst seeking asylum (asylum seekers are not permitted to work) and to gain experiences that will enable them to be ‘work ready’ once they have been successful in their asylum claim. Covid has limited volunteering opportunities, which are invaluable to language acquisition, feeling of well-being and being a valued member of society.”

With support from the Badur Foundation, the team have purchased core equipment for the bakery, which aims to launch in Spring 2021 (dependent on COVID-19). In the longer term, Big River Bakery Teesside aims to move out of the University’s Launchpad into a commercial space, where it will continue to operate as a fully functioning community bakery.

WOODSHED WORKSHOP - Badur Foundation
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WOODSHED WORKSHOP Providing good work through woodwork

Woodshed Workshop provides transformational opportunities to vulnerable, socially excluded and disadvantaged people, empowering them to develop the skills, confidence and resilience to thrive independently. With support from the Badur Foundation, provision will be extended to include an accredited qualification, preparing marginalised young people for the world of work, or into further education and training.

Founded in 2018, Woodshed Workshop is a Community Interest Company that supports its service users with practical training and education to develop woodcraft and trade skills, enabling them to participate in real workshop-to-retail projects. This enhances and consolidates their employability skills while also engendering a sense of value and self-worth: helping them to build the confidence and soft skills that are crucial to success in employment and in everyday life. The team designs and creates high quality wood furniture and products through innovative use of reclaimed, recycled, reused, and ethically and locally sourced wood.

Woodshed Workshop has a strong focus on supporting the long-term unemployed, young people who are not in employment, education or training (NEET), those with disabilities, and those who are, or who are at risk of being socially isolated. Based in Sacriston - County Durham, the team seeks to address social issues in the local area by engaging young people with their services and reconnecting them to their local community in a positive way.

A key next step for Woodshed Workshop is to offer an accredited qualification alongside all of the other activities that take place to enable marginalised young people to enter meaningful employment or to access further training/education and to raise their aspirations. The young people will engage in Skills for Employment, Training and Personal Development (SETPD), with sector specific units in construction. Training will be delivered at a person-centered level, with options from Entry Level Three through to Level Two, with Awards, Certificates and in the longer-term Diplomas achieved. This will create a full education offer for those of varying abilities, starting points, progression aims and exit strategies.

Woodshed Workshop’s offer will have an upper limit of five young people per day and will offer activities during school holiday periods to maintain engagement, including enrichment activities. The team supports low numbers in order to deliver flexible and tailored support, achieving high quality over quantity. To date, the team has worked with over 150 people, many of whom have progressed to further training, education or into secure, rewarding employment.

Resilience pilot programme - Badur Foundation
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Resilience pilot programme To enhance the organisational resilience of charities

In 2020, the Badur Foundation initiated an innovative new programme to further enhance the support provided to its current and former partners. The initiative is especially timely as organisations grapple with the challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The aim of the Resilience pilot programme is to provide complex and tailored organisational development for charities working with marginalised communities in the fields of education and development, to improve the quality of life of their beneficiaries. The intended overall outcome of the programme is to foster more resilient organisations, which can optimise their ways of working in a changing environment in order to effectively achieve their social impact.

The opportunity to participate in the first round of the programme is offered to current and former partners of the Foundation by invitation. The programme is implemented by the Badur Foundation in collaboration with the Flow Foundation.

Development will be provided to participating organisations in the following areas:

Trainers' list

Development is provided in a complex way through group workshops, individual consultations and financial support. The structure of the programme is:

During the workshop phase, organisations will have the opportunity to participate in a holistic workshop programme lasting 10.5 days. Teams will deepen their understanding, enabling them to better address organisational challenges with the help of practical assignments provided by the trainers. In addition, each team will receive vital individual support by pro bono mentors and the whole workshop process will be supported by an online platform, Promote®. The training will last from April to July 2021.

At the end of the workshop phase, the organisations will present their findings and development plan to the Badur Foundation and the staff of the Flow Foundation (in September 2021). Based on this, the Board of Trustees of the Badur Foundation will decide on further professional and financial support.

In the second phase of the programme, 3-4 organisations will receive customised professional and financial support tailored to their development needs. The capacity building period covers 2 years, from September 2021 to September 2023. During the second year, Trustees will reaffirm the support to each individual organisation based on the results of the first year.

Thumbnail credit: Stephen Walker, Unsplash

Mentor felhívás

A Badur Alapítvány és a Flow Alapítvány önkéntes mentorokat keres 2021. márciusában induló Rezíliencia Programjához.

További információk a programról és a jelentkezés módjáról a felhívásban találhatóak.

Beadási határidő: 2021. február 26. 24:00

“Top 5 ingatlanpiaci szakmai szervezet” - Tudod, kik állnak mögötte? - Badur Foundation
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“Top 5 ingatlanpiaci szakmai szervezet” - Tudod, kik állnak mögötte?

CHARITY SHOP AND FAIR NETWORK - Badur Foundation
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CHARITY SHOP AND FAIR NETWORK Providing access to quality second-hand products for people in poverty and employment opportunities for former foster care youth

“Fecske” (Swallow Bird) charity shop and network is a social enterprise initiated and implemented by the Live Consciously Association in one of the most disadvantaged regions in Hungary. It provides access to quality products at an affordable price for people in poverty.

The mission of the Live Consciously Association is “to prevent the children whose parents were formerly in foster care from being taken into state care” through providing complex support for families in poverty as well as youth in foster care. The Association was established in 2000 and initially implemented prevention programmes in different regions of Hungary.

In 2017, the first charity shop was opened in southern Hungary, in Kecskemét, providing job opportunities for a young adult formerly in foster care. Currently, the Association is focusing on North-East Hungary and opened a charity shop in Tiszadob, in Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg County.

The goal of the Association is to launch a rural charity shop network and fair in the surrounding disadvantaged settlements of Tiszadob. The network will secure employment for the beneficiaries and provide access to second-hand products including white goods and furniture at an affordable price, helping to improve the quality of life of the local community. Moreover, any profit generated by the shops and fairs will be used to help families in need.

Based on the business plan developed in the Hatchery Programme 2019, Badur Trustees awarded a grant to the Association as a 50% contribution towards the purchase of a van, as well as professional support to help them to develop a rural charity shop and fair network. Moreover, the Trustees awarded an extra grant to develop their PR and marketing activities through creating a communication strategy and improving the branding of the charity shop.

The first new charity shop was opened in the neighbouring Tiszadada in November 2020. The initial revenue was lower than expected due to the COVID-19 situation, along with less local awareness of the Association. Finding new customers and increasing marketing activities is a current focus.

Buddhist Heritage Project’s Autumn Newsletter - Badur Foundation
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Buddhist Heritage Project’s Autumn Newsletter

Environmental - Badur Foundation
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Environmental

Launching a Sandwich Manufactory - Badur Foundation
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Launching a Sandwich Manufactory Creating employment opportunities for a vulnerable community

Since 2003, Tegyünk Egymásért Egyesület (Let’s Help Each Other Association) has been active in Pécs-Somogy, one of the most impoverished neighbourhoods of Pécs. Its work focuses on community building and employment generating activities.

The Association works with vulnerable people living in Pécs-Somogy. Besides community development, it has been running entrepreneurial activity for three years, which aims to create occasional job opportunities for disadvantaged people.To expand its business of selling chips and donuts at nearby festivals, the Association launched a sandwich manufactory in 2021 in order to create additional employment opportunities. The business model was designed in the Hatchery Programme. Badur Trustees awarded financial support to create the kitchen and purchase kitchen equipment for the manufactory. Badur also provided further professional support, which aims to ensure the successful implementation of the business idea.

The initial experiences of the sandwich manufactory are promising. The Association is developing stable resale cooperation with local shops and expanding its product range in accordance with customer requirements.

Under the Hatchery Programme, the Association was also awarded a loan to purchase a second set of equipment for its chips and donuts stand so that it could increase sales at festivals. After the cancellation of festivals due to COVID-19, the Association decided to delay the use of the loan and may draw it down later in consultation with the Foundation.

Banner photo credit: Louis Hansel @shotsoflouis on Unsplash.

Meadow Restoration - Badur Foundation
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Meadow Restoration

Devon Environment Foundation - Badur Foundation
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Devon Environment Foundation Protecting and restoring nature in Devon

Most of us take more from nature than we give back, disrupting the delicately balanced natural ecosystems that provide us with everything we need. Fortunately, Nature-based Solutions are readily available, and Devon is the perfect place to scale them. The Devon Environment Foundation (DEF) was set up to identify the most effective local projects using Nature-based Solutions and provide the financial boost they need to accelerate and amplify their impact.

Devon enjoys diverse, valuable wildlife habitats including woodlands, wetlands, moorlands, meadows, hedgerows, rivers, estuaries, and many more beneath the surface of its coastal waters. Over recent decades, Devon’s natural assets have significantly diminished. To restore nature’s balance they require urgent, transformative action to protect what is left and regenerate what has been lost. The DEF channels vital funding and support to local projects to enable them to achieve their goals, expand, and share best practice to replicate the benefits in neighbouring areas.

The Badur Foundation supported DEF in the early stages of its formation, as well as taking a place on its Steering Committee. The Steering Committee is made up of founding and actively involved supporters; their role is to analyse and approve grants, whilst using their networks to broaden awareness of and support for the initiative. DEF is run by a Devon-based Executive Director who is assisted by local experts and the Steering Committee. While many environmental initiatives focus on single issues, DEF supports projects that fall into three broad themes: landscape regeneration, river restoration, and marine conservation.

The DEF’s vision is to see at least 30% of Devon ‘for nature’ by 2030. They intend to fulfill this by working with local partners to implement bold nature regeneration projects that can be replicated and scaled, enabling local nature recovery to leave a positive legacy for future generations. Here are some projects the DEF has recently funded:

· The Apricot Centre - A regenerative farm that has collected five years’ worth of data demonstrating how farming can be productive whilst sequestering carbon, supporting biodiversity, creating climate resilience, and providing local food security. Funding will enable themto share the learnings in innovative ways, so more farmers discover the benefits of regenerative practices and gain confidence to adopt them too.

· Moor Meadows - A community meadow restoration scheme that increases plant and insect biodiversity by encouraging landowners to create, conserve, and restore vital meadow habitat on Dartmoor. Funding will enable them to create a toolkit to share their expertise further afield and inspire more landowners to devote space for meadows in new areas of Devon.

· Biome Algae - An off-shore seaweed farming research trial, that aims to prove the economic, environmental, and social benefits of off-shore kelp farming, particularly for coastal communities. Funding will enable the trial to take place so they can share the findings, with the goal of scaling this pioneering practice to other locations off the Devon and Cornwall coasts.

· Till the Coast is Clear - A plastic pollution clean-up initiative employing a rib and recycled plastic kayaks to access hard-to-reach areas of rivers, coast, and estuary while educating and engaging the community and eco-tourists around plastic waste prevention. Funding will enable them to continue their vital work and amplify their impact; cleaning-up and raising awareness in new locations along the Devon coast.

Badur is excited to work in partnership with the Devon Environment Foundation towards the shared goal of supporting grassroots projects that regenerate nature, especially those that can be replicated and scaled.

Environmental - Badur Foundation
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Environmental

DONATING FROM THE REST OF THE WORLD - Badur Foundation
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DONATING FROM THE REST OF THE WORLD

Buddhist Heritage Project’s Summer Newsletter - Badur Foundation
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Buddhist Heritage Project’s Summer Newsletter

Catering Social Enterprise - Badur Foundation
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Catering Social Enterprise Helping homeless people by reinvesting organisational profit

Inbar Nonprofit Kft. operates a homeless shelter and runs a kitchen in partnership with the Hungarian Calvary Chapel in the heart of Budapest. It seeks to scale up its catering services in order to obtain extra financial sources for developing the shelter.

The homeless shelter was established about twenty years ago. As well as a stable and secure environment, the shelter provides various services to vulnerable people in the area (e.g. a daily meal, leisure activities, access to washing facilities etc.). The shelter also provides tailored support to its beneficiaries in order to help their reintegration into society and the labour market. The shelter offers valuable opportunities for numerous homeless people to recover from their crisis and move forward with their lives.

Inbar recognised that the shelter’s kitchen could provide catering services for external customers and its expansion could generate additional income for the shelter. In addition, the kitchen could provide transitional employment opportunities for its beneficiaries, contributing to their skills development, restoring their self-esteem and providing a job reference. After its initial success, Inbar applied to Badur’s Hatchery Programme in 2019 to develop a detailed business plan focusing on the scale up of its catering services. The business plan highlighted three areas that are necessary for the expansion: i) to increase online food sales, ii) to upgrade its marketing activities, iii) to develop kitchen equipment. The financial calculations were very promising, so Badur Trustees awarded a loan to implement the business concept.

While the scaling up process was stalled because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the expansion started in the second half of 2020. Inbar’s catering services aim to target three main business areas: community and business events, school-canteens and food delivery services. As the first step, the website will be developed to ensure Inbar can handle increased demand for its food services on a professional level. The Foundation will support further development phases as needed.

Banner photo credit: Nordwood Themes on Unsplash

Nagy dobás előtt állnak a végzős dokumentumfilm-rendezők - 1. rész - Badur Foundation
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Nagy dobás előtt állnak a végzős dokumentumfilm-rendezők - 1. rész

Make Your Way - Badur Foundation
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Make Your Way Supporting ex-offenders through meaningful community projects

Make Your Way has successfully worked with offenders in prison and ex-offenders in the community through a range of projects with furniture, gardening and DIY. Individuals are supported to re-integrate into society and stop offending behaviour. With support from Badur, Make Your Way aims to consolidate and extend its contributions to the local community.

Make Your Way CIC is a social enterprise founded by Loree Moran-Wilson, an ex-offender (due to addiction) who has reformed, gained a BSc honours degree in Criminology from Northumbria as well as many other qualifications. Make your Way primarily supports ex-offenders in the community, teaching small groups to restore furniture whilst supporting each individual to re-integrate into society and gain meaningful experience. Make Your Way also holds the Local Welfare Provision contract for Sunderland City Council and delivers new and restored furniture directly to families in need. Recipients of the furniture are usually vulnerable and low-income residents who have little or no furniture and who therefore don’t have the disposable income to purchase necessities such as beds and sofas.

To gain additional organisational income, Make Your Way sells affordable, preloved furniture through its two new outlets in Sunderland and Newcastle, something it aims to expand. It also seeks to train more people through the upcycling of furniture and production of bespoke items, once Make Your Way has additional resource and capacity in place. With funding from the Badur Foundation, Make Your Way gained business support from Social Enterprise Acumen to develop a strategic and financial plan, enabling it to improve its viability and further develop its services.

The Foundation continues to work with Make Your Way closely, supporting the team to put in place the appropriate resources and systems to develop MYW’s activity.

Bio-briquette Manual - Badur Foundation
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Bio-briquette Manual

Roma Kurázsi - Badur Foundation
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Roma Kurázsi

Szegénységben élő gyerekek és a digitális távoktatás - Badur Foundation
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Szegénységben élő gyerekek és a digitális távoktatás

Te vagy felelős Szomna haláláért? - Badur Foundation
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Te vagy felelős Szomna haláláért?

A BELSŐVÉ TETT STIGMÁTÓL A SELF-FASHIONINGIG - Badur Foundation
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A BELSŐVÉ TETT STIGMÁTÓL A SELF-FASHIONINGIG

Volt olyan gyerek, aki azt sem tudta, mi az a tablet - Badur Foundation
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Volt olyan gyerek, aki azt sem tudta, mi az a tablet

Giving Yoga - Badur Foundation
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Giving Yoga Mental well-being through yoga for vulnerable groups

AdniJóga (Giving Yoga) is a social enterprise with the aim to provide sustainable access to the physical and mental benefits of yoga and mindfulness to everyone who would otherwise not be able to experience calmness through movement and breath.

Mental health issues are on the rise worldwide. These issues disproportionately affect those living below the poverty line as poverty acts as a chronic stressor. Unfortunately, vulnerable people in difficult life situations are less likely to access mental health support services or physical help to deal with their trauma. In Hungary, 2 million people are estimated to struggle with mental health issues, and only 100,000 have access to state funded therapy. AdniJóga Foundation aims to compensate for this gap in care by providing trauma-focused yoga sessions to vulnerable groups.

Their story started in 2017 on a Greek island, with AdniJóga’s founder delivering their first yoga sessions to refugee women living in an overcrowded camp. Women appreciated the sense of calm the sessions brought to their lives, which gave AdniJóga’s founder the motivation to continue this work after her return to Hungary.

The charitable classes are delivered in cooperation with local non-profit organisations. Through its partners, AdniJóga works with a wide range of target groups: children living infoster homes or in low income families, refugees, migrants, domestic abuse survivors, young people with autism and parents raising children with disabilities. Yoga offers several proven benefits to these participants from improved physical wellbeing, through increased resilience to better emotional awareness.

In order to offer their classes to vulnerable groups free of charge, AdniJóga generates revenue from their pop-up classes and office yoga sessions. Under the Hatchery Programme, the team drew up a detailed pilot plan aiming to reach break-even point by the end of 2020. To achieve this goal, AdniJóga needs to grow the number of corporate partners and reprice their services.

Badur Trustees awarded financial support to cover operating losses in the pilot period and professional support to help implement the pilot plan throughout 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the team had to swiftly move its service offer online and needs to continuously revise their business plan. The Foundation was closely monitoring the developments and provided assistance as needed. Despite the challenges, AdniJóga closed a very successful year. It grew the number of its company partners, diversified its services and also managed to run the majority of its charitable classes online. The social enterprise could not reach break-even in 2020, but with the support of the Foundation they revised their business plan for 2021 and the point of sustainability is in close reach.

Third Sector Trends in North East England 2020 - Badur Foundation
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Third Sector Trends in North East England 2020

Buddhist Archives Building - Badur Foundation
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Buddhist Archives Building Urgent structural and roof repairs to the historical Buddhist Archives

The Buddhist Archives Building at Vat Khily preserves a collection of almost 40,000 historic photographs that had been carefully hidden by the Monks in order to protect them from the civil wars and ultimate revolution in 1975. It is the most important collection of photography in Laos. With support from the Foundation, the Buddhist Heritage Project will carry out urgent structural and roof repairs to ensure this significant building will survive well into the future.

In recent years, the Archive collection has expanded to include diaries, correspondence, notes and commentaries from hundreds of sources, and a large number of historic palm leaf manuscripts. The collection is carefully stored under rigorous conditions in accordance with professional international museum standards. The building in which this important collection is housed is almost one hundred years old, and is a structure firmly covered by the rules of the UNESCO World Heritage Office of Luang Prabang. The building and some of the surrounds of the temple were restored thanks to a previous grant from the Badur Foundation in 2013 and 2014.

Since the initial restoration there have been a series of natural “events”, which collectively, have caused significant cracks going right through the 60 cm thick wall: Earth tremors stemming from earthquakes in neighbouring provinces, as well as severe localised thunderstorms, plus the gradual collapse of the left bank of the Nam Khan river, which has caused a number of the houses along that side of the river to subside. It also became apparent that the roof tiles on the building need replacing. A structural engineer calculated the fixed load of the roof tiles, plus the load of the interior Archival furnishings and materials. The roof tiles weigh more than 20,000 kg and the interior load is not much less.

To repair the building, the Buddhist Heritage Project worked with local engineers and builders to create steel reinforced concrete ‘beams’ that were inserted horizontally into the exterior of the ground floor walls of the building at strategic points on all sides. The beams will take on the burden of support as if they had been installed during the original construction. The second course of action was to provide significant structural support under the floor of the second level, the floor that holds the bulk of the weight of the collections and the cabinetry. Once in place, the new support was plastered over and is no longer visible to maintain the aesthetics of the building. The final stage was to replace the roof tiles with approved cement versions of the traditional clay tiles, which should last decades rather than years.

These major engineering interventions aim to provide all the support necessary for the building to survive for many years to come.

CREATIVE WORKSHOP SPACE - Badur Foundation
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CREATIVE WORKSHOP SPACE An opportunity for local artisans to refine and develop their skills

The Buddhist community of Luang Prabang have already established an innovative Vocational School of Arts, the first of its kind in Laos dedicated to training students in traditional artisan skills whilst preparing them for employment on graduation. To maximise employment opportunities for graduating students, Buddhist Heritage Project, in partnership with the Badur Foundation and other local parties, aims to provide a creative workshop space for local artisans.

The Buddhist Heritage Project already supports a range of initiatives of the Buddhist community in the preservation of its cultural heritage, and education programmes are the heart of the Buddhist Heritage Project’s mission. Responding to requests from the Buddhist Sangha and the needs of the community, the team now aims to provide an accessible and creative workshop space in the centre of Luang Prabang.

Importantly, the workshop space will enable graduates from the Arts School (and others) to have access to a clean, purpose-equipped workshop where they could continue to practice and refine their skills, potentially deriving income from selling their output through Buddhist Heritage Project’s social enterprise shop, Celadon. The workshop will also provide the opportunity for other artisans in town to use the space, as well as becoming a source of artisanal pieces for display and sale in the shop.

After securing the workshop premises, the Buddhist Heritage Project team started the process of repair and renovation, with the first workshop activity commencing. Funding from the Badur Foundation enabled the team to buy the necessary high-end equipment for the space and the team aim to fully equip the new area with an extensive range of tools.

Arts and architecture remain at the foundation of Luang Prabang’s cultural heritage. The new workshop is key in enabling graduates from the Arts School to carry on this work, as well as providing an opportunity for other artisans; continuing the preservation of traditional skills whilst providing increasingly needed opportunities for local artisans to gain an income. The Foundation will continue to work closely with the Project team as the new space develops further.

Think for the Future - Badur Foundation
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Think for the Future

The European Venture Philanthropy Association (EVPA) - Badur Foundation
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The European Venture Philanthropy Association (EVPA)

Voluntary Organisations’ Network North East (VONNE) - Badur Foundation
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Voluntary Organisations’ Network North East (VONNE)

Foundation Futures - Badur Foundation
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Foundation Futures

Oswin Project - Badur Foundation
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Oswin Project

Environmental Funders Network (EFN) - Badur Foundation
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Environmental Funders Network (EFN)

COVID-19 - Badur Foundation
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COVID-19 RESPONSE

COVID-19

2019 Annual Report & Financial Statements - Badur Foundation
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2019 Annual Report & Financial Statements

Erzsébet Gulyás - Badur Foundation
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Erzsébet Gulyás

Employment of Community Assistants - Badur Foundation
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COVID-19 RESPONSE

Employment of Community Assistants To enhance the impact of a complex educational programme

The interlinked problems of segregation, a malfunctioning education system, unemployment and poverty create a vicious circle for the marginalised community of Csobánka that prevents social mobility and leads to generations of disadvantage. Csodaműhely Association aimed to tackle this problem by running a Complex Programme for Equal Opportunities targeting infants, children, teenagers, adults and professionals alike.

The Complex Programme for Equal Opportunities currently has the following main pillars:

  • Toy Play Hub – creating an inclusive centre where Roma and non-Roma parents and their children (0-10 years) can play, develop and forge friendships across different social status.
  • Afterschool Programme – developing competences of school-aged children via individual tutoring, mentoring and community events.
  • Adult Education Programme – providing an opportunity for adults to finish their primary education, attain vocational certificates and advance their employment in the primary labour market.
  • Trainings and Meetings for Local Professionals – creating a professional network andproviding skills development opportunities for stakeholders such as careworkers, teachers, kindergarten and nursery staff.

The work of the Association has enjoyed wide-spread support throughout the community, as they celebrate their 8th year of establishment. However, some programme elements are less embedded in the local community due to their more recent introduction. In addition, it is common that information about programmes does not reach certain families. In some cases, the organisation has also faced organisational challenges due to capacity shortages.

To help address these challenges, the Foundation supported the Community Assistance Pilot Programme with funding for the employment of three local assistants - initially for one year (October 2019 – October 2020). The pilot tested whether the employment of community assistants could lead to a smoother operation and greater impact by ensuring: information reached all families, the needs of the community and subsequent feedback as gathered more efficiently by the Association, community members better understood the opportunities available, as well as being motivated and supported to take full advantage of the programmes. The pilot programme also aimed to provide capacity building and development opportunities for the community assistants whose professional trajectory could take a new turn, after gaining valuable experience in the charity sector.

The initial months of implementation proved that the role of local community assistants is highly needed and they provided extremely helpful insights, contributing to the success of the programmes. During the COVID-19 lockdown, the work of community assistants became even more essential. Since the other employees of the Association could only reach the community online, all personal communication with the families, along with the distribution of donations was done through the local assistants.

Despite the initial success, due to the novelty of the positions within both the Association and the community, extra support was needed to support the community assistants, especially at the start of the programme. Therefore, the Foundation awarded additional funds towards professional mentoring of the local community assistants. Through the provision of mentoring by Partners Hungary Foundation, the capacity, self- confidence and skills development of the local assistants was enhanced. In addition, constructive feedback was provided to the entire organisation making the cooperation of the members smoother. All in all, through the mentoring, the contribution of local community assistants has become even more effective.

Having witnessed the outstanding results of the pilot programme, the Foundation has committed to support the Community Assistance programme for the next three years (November 2020- October 2023). During this period, Wonderworkshop Association will work towards increasing its own funding towards the programme so that its sustainability can be ensured after the Foundation’s grant comes to an end.

Foundation Futures - Badur Foundation
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COVID-19 RESPONSE

Foundation Futures Helping young people find out what they can do instead of what they can’t

Foundation Futures deliver a range of activities that benefit their local community, focusing on disadvantaged young people and their families; particularly those at risk of underachievement in education. With support from the Badur Foundation, the team aim to extend their provision using RaspberryPi computers to aid learning by making things.

Foundation Futures was set up in 2014 by two specialist teachers disillusioned with the education system and how the most vulnerable were being let down and excluded. They are based in the Byker Wall Estate, which is listed in the bottom 2% of the government’s index of multiple deprivation. 53% of children on the estate live in low income families and 33% access food banks regularly. 10% of school aged children on the estate are excluded from school and over 65% do not gain 5 A*- C grades at GCSE (9 – 4 in the new grading structure). Only 11% of households on the estate have access to a computer, which further disadvantages local young people.

The Foundation Futures team already have a strong presence in the Estate, engaging with over 100 residents every week ranging in age from 4 to 96 years old. Their 2 youth clubs and supplementary holiday clubs are attended by around 40 children every week. They also run a Community Education Hub, a Friday Kitchen Lunch Club for older residents and a weekly educational programme for 10 young people who are NEET (not in education, employment or training).

Foundation Futures aim to expand their offer through a new project: Foundation Futures’ Makes Stuff. Based on the work of Seymour Papert, workshops will be delivered using computers to aid learning by making things, and the sessions seek to act as a vehicle to engage young people and other local residents. The project aims to promote confidence in using IT, build skills for employment, whilst providing positive socialising and collaboration opportunities. By building and using computers then using them creatively to make other practical objects, participants will be able to see and touch their creations, feeling a sense of pride and achievement. This aims to be the encouragement needed to spur them on to wider projects with the support of local staff and volunteers.

In the longer-term, this extension of Foundation Futures’ work aims to be self-sustaining by offering income generating workshops to primary and secondary schools, as well as running coding, gaming and STEM (Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) holiday clubs in more affluent areas. The team also wish to include STEM qualifications and accreditation as part of their offer, ultimately seeking to create a more technologically skilled local workforce.

Live Consciously Association - Badur Foundation